Project Examples

  • North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project

    North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project

    WestLand contracted with the Town of Prescott Valley to prepare a final design report and plans for the construction of recharge basins located near the confluence of the Agua Fria River and Coyote Wash in Prescott Valley, referred to as the North Plains project.

  • North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project

    North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project

    The design report and plans for the basin recharge of approximately 4,000 acre-feet per year were prepared in part to fulfill the Arizona Department of Environmental Quality Aquifer Protection Permit and the Arizona Department of Water Resources Underground Storage Facility permit applications.

  • North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project

    North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project

    Final design report and plans included site grading, hydraulic modeling, piping, and reclaimed water delivery to 22 recharge basins.

  • North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project

    North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project

    Pressure control valves, Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA), and Solar Power were incorporated into the project design. WestLand provided final design plans and oversaw the construction of the first phase recharge basins.

  • North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project
  • North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project
  • North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project
  • North Plains Recharge Basin Design Project
  • South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation

    South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation

    WestLand provided engineering services and complete construction drawings for slip-lining and manhole base design details and assisted in producing extensive flow management plans.

  • South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation

    South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation

    The project area encompassed densely populated 50-year-old neighborhoods, an elementary school, a popular fitness center, a busy animal shelter and a portion of “The Loop” shared-use trail.

  • South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation

    South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation

    Using an innovative combination of cured in place pipe (CIPP) and slip-lining techniques rather than excavating and replacing the large-diameter lines, the CMAR team was able to complete the project three months ahead of schedule, under budget, and without major disruptions to the public including zero interruptions to existing services.

  • South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation

    South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation

    This is the first of three major projects that will rehabilitate 14 miles of large-diameter sewer pipe and construct a connection across the Rillito River – an investment that will extend the life of the community’s wastewater facilities by more than 50 years.

  • South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation
  • South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation
  • South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation
  • South Rillito West Central Interceptor Rehabilitation
  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    The National Park Service is replacing a portion of the 16-mile Trans Canyon Pipeline in Phantom Ranch at Grand Canyon National Park. The only source of drinking water for all of the Grand Canyon Park facilities, construction of the Trans Canyon water system began in 1965, was nearly destroyed by a flood in 1966, and was completed in 1970. The Silver Bridge, which crossed over the Colorado River, serves both as a pedestrian bridge for hikers, and as a support for the Trans Canyon water line.

  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    The aging existing pipeline is constructed of aluminum pipe that over the past decade has suffered numerous leaks, fissures and breaks.

  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    WestLand is acting as the NPS Construction Manager Representative (CMR), providing onsite inspectors to oversee the installation of a new 8” Schedule 80 steel pipe designed and constructed for operating pressures of 740 psi.

  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    The pipeline is so remote that whenever there is a break, there are only two ways to get to it: mule train or helicopter.

  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line

    WestLand's inspectors have to hike in and out of the canyon, where they camp during their inspection stints. Each stint lasts for nine days–one day to hike in, seven days at the camp, and one day to hike out.

  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line
  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line
  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line
  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line
  • Grand Canyon Trans Canyon Line
  • Marana Health Center Environmental Assessment

    Marana Health Center Environmental Assessment

    The Town of Marana applied for federal funding for the construction of a new health services facility. WestLand conducted a full range of environmental studies, including completing a cultural resources survey and report and obtaining clearance from the SHPO for this project.

  • Marana Health Center Environmental Assessment

    Marana Health Center Environmental Assessment

    WestLand prepared an EA in accordance with NEPA guidelines. The report identified the potential impacts to the environment associated with the construction of the MHC facility within the framework of the cited Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) guidance, and followed NEPA guidance for projects seeking funding under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, signed into law February 17, 2009.

  • Marana Health Center Environmental Assessment
  • Marana Health Center Environmental Assessment
  • Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis

    Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis

    Tucson Electric Power (TEP), a Unisource company, contracted WestLand to provide a fast-track route and property analysis for a planned 138-kV transmission line connecting the DeMoss Petrie substation to the Tucson substation in central Tucson.

  • Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis

    Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis

    The approach to this site selection analysis relied heavily on customized modeling and WestLand’s GIS analysts working closely with technical experts in engineering, property acquisition, and environmental permitting.

  • Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis

    Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis

    The results of the evaluation provided TEP with the tools to graphically indicate where new right of way acquisitions (full takes or easements) were required and the costs associated with obtaining property rights for the project. The GIS system created for this project was used to produce detailed maps for conveying the restrictive aspects of each alignment during public stakeholder meetings and Arizona Corporation Commission Line Siting Committee hearings.

  • Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis

    Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis

    Once the final route was selected, WestLand archaeologists conducted a cultural resources survey to identify the archaeological sites or significant historic resources that might be adversely affected by the proposed construction and to help project designers minimize impacts to significant cultural resources. The successful completion of this project demonstrates WestLand’s ability to perform multiple services on linear projects in an urban environment, including mapping, cartography, property, cultural resource, and natural resource planning within a GIS framework.

  • Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis
  • Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis
  • Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis
  • Unisource Power Corporation DMP to Tucson Route Analysis
  • Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project

    Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project

    WestLand provided design and construction period services for this sewer lift station project to serve the Eagle Crest development in Pinal County. The project was designed per PCRWRD standards and requirements for acceptance into the PCRWRD system.

  • Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project

    Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project

    The project included duplex submersible pumps in a lined and coated pre-cast concrete wet well, above ground discharge manifold, backup power generator, grit manhole, chemical injection system with HDPE tank and metering pumps, aerated wet well, and telemetry equipment and controls for PCRWRD monitoring and control.

  • Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project

    Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project

    WestLand engineering staff provided the engineer's certification of construction for the project.

  • Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project
  • Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project
  • Eagle Crest Sewer Lift Station Design and Construction Project
  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    The Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area restoration project is a 668-acre AGFD river restoration and emergent wetland project on property acquired by AGFD for migratory waterfowl habitat. It is located southeast of the confluence of Chevelon Creek and the Little Colorado River.

  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    The project encompasses a unique wildlife area in that Chevelon Creek is one of the few perennial streams in northern Arizona. The baseflow is consistent even through drought years and is probably why the area has numerous archeological sites showing evidence of historic Native American settlement.

  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    As with many riparian and wetland areas in Arizona, this wildlife area is infested with tamarisk that has drastically reduced biological diversity by outcompeting native vegetation and increasing the salt content of surrounding soils.

  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    For multiple reasons, including the decay of the man-made impoundments, equipment disrepair, and tamarisk encroachment, the CCWA was no longer a considered as a healthy emergent wetland area.

  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    Westland designed and prepared construction documents for the restoration of approximately 1 mile of Chevelon Creek and 120-acres of emergent wetland.

  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project

    Key points of the project development include geomorphology investigation, hydraulic analysis, emergent wetlands hydrology, vegetation surveys, and CWA Section 404 permitting.

  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project
  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project
  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project
  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project
  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project
  • Chevelon Creek Wildlife Area Restoration Project
  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    WestLand developed and implemented a Booster Pump Energy Efficiency Testing Program for the City of Tucson Water Department. The primary goals of this project were to perform energy efficiency evaluations of individual booster pumps, implement upgrades at Tucson Water booster stations, and develop a sustainable Booster Energy Efficiency Program for Tucson Water’s future use.

  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    WestLand’s evaluation resulted in the identification of energy saving opportunities, which were further prioritized based on financial analysis (payback-period considerations). It was anticipated that the top priority sites, referred to as the “low-hanging fruit”, would generate the greatest improvement in energy usage for the lowest up-front investment.

  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    As part of this comprehensive program development for Tucson Water, WestLand performed testing at 24 Tucson Water booster stations (about 20 percent of all Tucson Water booster sites), which constituted a total of 105 pumps.

  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    The pumps tested included horizontal end suction, vertical turbine, and submersible pumps ranging from 5 to 350 horsepower in size. The data collected from efficiency testing included flow rate, suction and discharge pressures, and electrical data such as amperage, voltage, power, and power factor.

  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Upgrades that were identified to improve booster efficiencies included replacing old and aging pumps and motors, performing pump and motor reconditioning, installing variable frequency drives, minimizing head loss through replacement of undersized manifolds, and adjustments in system operation.

  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Additional recommendations for future work included guidelines for appropriate use of premium and super-premium efficiency motors, and performing system-wide analysis to review operational criteria.

  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Based on testing results and energy efficiency projections, it is calculated that the total upgrade cost of approximately $166,000 will result in approximately 615,000 kilowatt-hours of annual energy savings and $52,100 of annual cost savings, resulting in an average payback period for the upgrades of less than four years.

  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program

    This project was funded through a DOE Energy Efficiency and Conversation Block Grant of the DOE under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. The final results far exceeded the EECBG project goals.

  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program
  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program
  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program
  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program
  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program
  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program
  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program
  • Tucson Water Booster Energy Efficiency Testing Program
  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    WestLand provided construction management of all wet utilities, including working with the Navajo Nation Parks and Recreation Department to hire a competent contractor, overseeing construction, and approving pay requests and change orders.

  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    Grading included the parking areas for the 160-room View Hotel and approximately 3,000 feet of access roads for the park and the wastewater treatment area.

  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    The project required significant coordination with the electrical facilities in the area, including the Navajo Tribal Utility Authority and coordination with several state and tribal agencies, including the Arizona Department of Transportation, Utah Department of Transportation, Bureau of Indian Affairs, Navajo Nation EPA, US EPA, and the Navajo Nation Natural Resources.

  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    WestLand designed several thousand feet of water and sewer mains, a new well pump, and an 8-mile water main to transport water from the well to a 252,000-gallon water storage tank coordinated by WestLand.

  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design

    WestLand provided infrastructure design of onsite water treatment and distribution, onsite wastewater collection and treatment, roads, parking, and drainage conveyance facilities for the new View Hotel, gift shop, administration facility, maintenance facility, and staff housing at the Monument Valley Tribal Park.

  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design
  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design
  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design
  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design
  • Monument Valley Tribal Park Infrastructure Design
  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Working with Tucson Unified School District, Tucson Parks and Recreation, the Davidson Elementary School administration, and the Davidson students, WestLand oversaw a participatory project planning process that lead to the creation of the Davidson Education Garden Master Plan.

  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    The master plan includes the education garden, cultivation garden, pathway system, new all accessible play structure and an exercise path with PAR stations.

  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Following the approval of the Master Plan, WestLand was prepared the construction documents for the entire plan to be constructed on the Davidson Elementary School grounds. Initial funding allowed the construction of the education garden and play structure portions of the plan.

  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    The Davidson Education Garden includes a meandering pathway system with teaching ramadas, seating areas, wildlife watering holes and areas for different types of plants and plant communities.

  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    The main garden area features a Sonoran desert area, a cactus and succulents of the world area and an area with plants that attract birds, butterflies and other wildlife.

  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Davidson Elementary School Education Garden

    Students worked with a project artist to create tiles that have been incorporated into the masonry work throughout the project. The new play area is fully accessible by wheelchairs that can roll into the structure and participate in a number of activities.

  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden
  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden
  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden
  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden
  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden
  • Davidson Elementary School Education Garden
  • National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project

    National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project

    WestLand conducted biological and archaeological site evaluations at specific historical underground mining features within AML sites at four units of the NPS in Arizona: Grand Canyon National Park, Saguaro National Park, Organ Pipe National Monument, and Coronado National Memorial.

  • National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project

    National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project

    The closure project, designed to restrict human access to abandoned mine openings with identified health and safety risks and/or high level of wildlife use while minimizing impacts on wildlife (mainly bats) and significant cultural resources, was funded by the federal government under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act.

  • National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project

    National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project

    Deadlines for funding availability necessitated a quick turnaround, in this case less than six months. Because of WestLand’s large staff and efficient field methodologies, all field tasks and reports were completed within the prescribed schedule.

  • National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project
  • National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project
  • National Park Service Abandoned Mineral Lands Project
  • Twin Arrows Casino and Resort

    Twin Arrows Casino and Resort

    WestLand reviewed construction plans and specifications for the proposed utilities for the Twin Arrows Resort and Casino for adherence to regulatory specifications, details and constructability.

  • Twin Arrows Casino and Resort

    Twin Arrows Casino and Resort

    WestLand also provided onsite construction inspections and oversight during the construction activities for all utilities under the jurisdiction of the NTUA.

  • Twin Arrows Casino and Resort
  • Twin Arrows Casino and Resort
  • City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project

    City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project

    WestLand worked with the City of Bisbee to obtain a Water Infrastructure Finance Authority (WIFA) Planning and Engineering Grant to fund this sewer lateral pilot study.

  • City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project

    City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project

    The City obtained additional grant funding from Border Environment Cooperation Commission (BECC) for the project, and provided a significant local match in the form of in-kind services for sewer lateral mapping and closed-circuit television (CCTV) review of the sewer laterals.

  • City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project

    City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project

    The focus of the project was review and evaluation of the condition of existing public sanitary sewer lateral serving historic Old Bisbee. The project was needed because of the failed or failing sewer laterals, resulting in frequent emergency responses to sanitary sewer overflows (SSOs) and excessive exfiltration.

  • City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project

    City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project

    The final report from the project will serve as the basis for the evaluation, design, and construction associated with sewer lateral improvement projects.

  • City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project
  • City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project
  • City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project
  • City of Bisbee Sewer Lateral Evaluation Pilot Project
  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    WestLand provided pro bono, preliminary planning and design services to the Tohono O’odham Nation for the area bounded by the Nation’s administrative offices, the Mission School, San Xavier Mission, the Elder Center and Planning offices on the Reservation near Tucson, Arizona.

  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    This area of the reservation accommodates many tourists visiting the Mission as well as tribal members seeking public services.  Existing conditions create conflicts between vehicles and pedestrians. Parking and drainage are also existing issues.

  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    Westland looked at vehicular and pedestrian circulation, existing topography, utilities, existing drainage, visual impacts, and existing construction materials to propose street, parking and hardscape improvements that calm existing vehicular traffic while providing safer and more defined pedestrian circulation routes.

  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    The proposed improvements utilize construction materials that repeat those used in architecture and public spaces existing in the area.

  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning

    Two options were proposed. One option recommended improvements with the existing buildings remaining as they are. The Second option recommended improvements assuming a new administrative complex building and associate parking area.

  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning
  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning
  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning
  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning
  • Tohono O’odham Pedestrian Safety Planning
  • TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project

    TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project

    Tucson Electric Power is conducting a multi-year effort to clear vegetation from beneath their twin 345 kV lines that run from the San Juan Basin in New Mexico to the town of Vail, in Pima County, Arizona.

  • TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project

    TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project

    The segment between the San Juan Basin and the northern boundary of the Zuni Indian reservation is located within the outer boundaries of the Navajo Nation. However, portions of the project also crossed a portion of the Nation that is checker-boarded with BLM and New Mexico State Land Office (NMSLO) property. Because the original cultural resources survey was done prior to the Navajo Nation cultural resources regulation, the Navajo Nation Historic Preservation Department (NNHPD) requested that the line be re-surveyed to meet modern standards and tribal regulations.

  • TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project

    TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project

    WestLand conducted the survey and prepared a monitoring plan that was accepted by the Navajo Nation, the NMSLO, and the BLM Albuquerque field office. WestLand’s monitoring crews included local Navajo archaeologists and worked closely with the vegetation management crews to identify cultural features on sites that were cleared with hand cutting crews.

  • TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project

    TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project

    This task of the project was particularly important because many historic period Navajo cultural features, such as corrals and brush fences, incorporated living trees. WestLand negotiated an agreement with the NNHPD that included preservation in place of most of these features and careful cutting of those cultural trees that posted a fire threat to the transmission line. The relationship built by WestLand’s collaborative efforts with the Navajo Nation led to a workshop on tribal cultural resources law led by an NNHPD compliance officer at the TEP facilities.

  • TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project
  • TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project
  • TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project
  • TEP San Juan to Zuni Vegetation Clearing Project
  • Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance

    Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance

    The Town of Marana contracted WestLand to provide cultural resources and environmental surveys for a 10-mile road widening project that included easements controlled by the Arizona State Land Department (ASLD), Pima County, and the Town of Marana.

  • Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance

    Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance

    The project included a Class I and Class III cultural resources inventory survey, an ASLD Native Plant Inventory, delineation of jurisdictional waters for compliance with the CWA, and a Biological Assessment to comply with the Endangered Species Act and completion of a Phase I Environmental Site Assessment (ESA).

  • Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance

    Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance

    All field surveys and report preparations were conducted by WestLand’s in-house staff. WestLand coordinated with agency personnel in the completion of these resource studies.

  • Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance
  • Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance
  • Tangerine Road Environmental Clearance
  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    WestLand designed the Miraval wastewater treatment plant, to treat wastewater from the Miraval resort to A+ quality for reuse or recharge. The project was a design-build delivery with contractor WRI Construction.

  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    The resort has somewhat concentrated waste with high BOD and nitrogen loading. In addition, flows change drastically based on the season.

  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    The WWTP consists of primary treatment to remove large solids, secondary treatment through anoxic and aerated zones, and tertiary treatment using sand filters and chlorination/dechlorination.

  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Because of the high nitrogen loading, the WWTP includes the ability to add carbon for denitrification.

  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    The WWTP also includes a way to short-circuit the secondary effluent – reducing the effective size of the plant – for off-season flows.

  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities
  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities
  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities
  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities
  • Miraval Resort and Spa Wastewater Treatment Facilities
  • APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build

    APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build

    WestLand provided all design and permitting services, for this project to replace well capacity used for cooling and drinking water at the APS Cholla Power Plant in Joseph City, Arizona.

  • APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build

    APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build

    WestLand provided a routing study, detailed hydraulic modeling, engineering design, and construction oversight of 14 new production wells and 8,500 linear feet of pipeline ranging from 12 to 42 inches in diameter. Twenty three individual ADEQ drinking water approvals were acquired by WestLand for the project.

  • APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build

    APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build

    The contract was let as design-build and all aspects of the project construction, with the exception of drilling, were completed by contractor WRI Construction. The WestLand team provided the client with all of the technical resources to execute the complex project in a short timeframe.

  • APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build

    APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build

    The collective experience of the design and construction teams allowed WestLand and WRI to scope the project in a manner so that no change orders were required. The overall project was designed, permitted, inspected, constructed, and certified in just over 400 days, meeting the project schedule.

  • APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build
  • APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build
  • APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build
  • APS Cholla Wellfield Design / Build